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© Copyright Steven Smalt 2014
May 29, 2014

© Copyright Steven Smalt 2014

May 29, 2014 / 4,979 notes

fastcompany:

Google’s Self-Driving Car Is Real, And It Looks Like A Tiny Bubble-Car

We’ve known Google has been working on self-driving cars for awhile now, but all of a sudden, the project is real: last night, Google revealed a working prototype of its self-driving car. It’s a two-seater that looks something like a mashup of a Fiat 500Steve Urkel’s car, and a cartoon smiley face.

Read More>


rebeccakrasneystropoli:
As income inequality in the U.S. continues to dominate economic headlines, it should come as little surprise that CEO pay is hitting record highs, according to a new Associated Press/Equilar study. While the S&P 500 notched a 30% gain in 2013, chief executives saw their compensation packages soar to the eight-figure mark for the first time, with median pay coming in at a cool $10.5 million, up 8.8% from 2012. Stock rewards alone grew 17% on the year, to $4.5 million. Given the 1.3% rise in salary the average U.S. employee received last year, these latest figures should help keep the pay disparity conversation going strong.
Of course, there’s also plenty of disparity within the rarefied CEO universe, with a $36.8 million compensation gap between just the top and 10th-highest earners on AP’s list. Anthony Petrello, CEO of oilfield-services company Nabors Industries (NBR), was at the head of the earning class in 2013, with a package worth $68.3 million. However, without the lump sum of $60 million Nabors paid to buy him out of his old contract, his income would have come in below the eight-figure median. CBS CEO Leslie Moonves, who came in at number two after topping the list in 2012, made $65.6 million as the company’s shares rose close to 70%.
May 29, 2014 / 20 notes

rebeccakrasneystropoli:

As income inequality in the U.S. continues to dominate economic headlines, it should come as little surprise that CEO pay is hitting record highs, according to a new Associated Press/Equilar study. While the S&P 500 notched a 30% gain in 2013, chief executives saw their compensation packages soar to the eight-figure mark for the first time, with median pay coming in at a cool $10.5 million, up 8.8% from 2012. Stock rewards alone grew 17% on the year, to $4.5 million. Given the 1.3% rise in salary the average U.S. employee received last year, these latest figures should help keep the pay disparity conversation going strong.

Of course, there’s also plenty of disparity within the rarefied CEO universe, with a $36.8 million compensation gap between just the top and 10th-highest earners on AP’s list. Anthony Petrello, CEO of oilfield-services company Nabors Industries (NBR), was at the head of the earning class in 2013, with a package worth $68.3 million. However, without the lump sum of $60 million Nabors paid to buy him out of his old contract, his income would have come in below the eight-figure median. CBS CEO Leslie Moonves, who came in at number two after topping the list in 2012, made $65.6 million as the company’s shares rose close to 70%.

(via yahoofinance)

techtrospection:

good #infographic  of #success  traits in #tech   #startup   #founders  + #artists  + #entrepreneurs  and …. well … anyonehttp://click-to-read-mo.re/p/6QBd
Apr 30, 2014 / 25 notes

techtrospection:

good #infographic  of #success  traits in #tech   #startup   #founders  + #artists  + #entrepreneurs  and …. well … anyone

http://click-to-read-mo.re/p/6QBd

thepeoplesrecord:

Secret Trans Pacific Partnership treaty chapter reveals even greater corporate control & international policing measuresNovember 14, 2013
On November 13, WikiLeaks released the secret negotiated draft text for the entire TPP (Trans-Pacific Partnership) Intellectual Property Rights Chapter. The TPP is the largest-ever economic treaty, encompassing nations representing more than 40 per cent of the world’s GDP. The WikiLeaks release of the text comes ahead of the decisive TPP Chief Negotiators summit in Salt Lake City, Utah, on 19-24 November 2013. The chapter published by WikiLeaks is perhaps the most controversial chapter of the TPP due to its wide-ranging effects on medicines, publishers, internet services, civil liberties and biological patents. Significantly, the released text includes the negotiation positions and disagreements between all 12 prospective member states.
The TPP is the forerunner to the equally secret US-EU pact TTIP (Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership), for which President Obama initiated US-EU negotiations in January 2013. Together, the TPP and TTIP will cover more than 60 per cent of global GDP. Both pacts exclude China.
Since the beginning of the TPP negotiations, the process of drafting and negotiating the treaty’s chapters has been shrouded in an unprecedented level of secrecy. Access to drafts of the TPP chapters is shielded from the general public. Members of the US Congress are only able to view selected portions of treaty-related documents in highly restrictive conditions and under strict supervision. It has been previously revealed that only three individuals in each TPP nation have access to the full text of the agreement, while 600 ’trade advisers’ – lobbyists guarding the interests of large US corporations such as Chevron, Halliburton, Monsanto and Walmart – are granted privileged access to crucial sections of the treaty text.
The TPP negotiations are currently at a critical stage. The Obama administration is preparing to fast-track the TPP treaty in a manner that will prevent the US Congress from discussing or amending any parts of the treaty. Numerous TPP heads of state and senior government figures, including President Obama, have declared their intention to sign and ratify the TPP before the end of 2013.
WikiLeaks’ Editor-in-Chief Julian Assange stated: “The US administration is aggressively pushing the TPP through the US legislative process on the sly.” The advanced draft of the Intellectual Property Rights Chapter, published by WikiLeaks on 13 November 2013, provides the public with the fullest opportunity so far to familiarise themselves with the details and implications of the TPP.
The 95-page, 30,000-word IP Chapter lays out provisions for instituting a far-reaching, transnational legal and enforcement regime, modifying or replacing existing laws in TPP member states. The Chapter’s subsections include agreements relating to patents (who may produce goods or drugs), copyright (who may transmit information), trademarks (who may describe information or goods as authentic) and industrial design.
The longest section of the Chapter – ’Enforcement’ – is devoted to detailing new policing measures, with far-reaching implications for individual rights, civil liberties, publishers, internet service providers and internet privacy, as well as for the creative, intellectual, biological and environmental commons. Particular measures proposed include supranational litigation tribunals to which sovereign national courts are expected to defer, but which have no human rights safeguards. The TPP IP Chapter states that these courts can conduct hearings with secret evidence. The IP Chapter also replicates many of the surveillance and enforcement provisions from the shelved SOPA and ACTA treaties.
The consolidated text obtained by WikiLeaks after the 26-30 August 2013 TPP meeting in Brunei – unlike any other TPP-related documents previously released to the public – contains annotations detailing each country’s positions on the issues under negotiation. Julian Assange emphasises that a “cringingly obsequious” Australia is the nation most likely to support the hardline position of US negotiators against other countries, while states including Vietnam, Chile and Malaysia are more likely to be in opposition. Numerous key Pacific Rim and nearby nations – including Argentina, Ecuador, Colombia, South Korea, Indonesia, the Philippines and, most significantly, Russia and China – have not been involved in the drafting of the treaty.
In the words of WikiLeaks’ Editor-in-Chief Julian Assange, “If instituted, the TPP’s IP regime would trample over individual rights and free expression, as well as ride roughshod over the intellectual and creative commons. If you read, write, publish, think, listen, dance, sing or invent; if you farm or consume food; if you’re ill now or might one day be ill, the TPP has you in its crosshairs.”
Current TPP negotiation member states are the United States, Japan, Mexico, Canada, Australia, Malaysia, Chile, Singapore, Peru, Vietnam, New Zealand and Brunei.
Read the full secret TPP treaty IP chapter here
Apr 30, 2014 / 420 notes

thepeoplesrecord:

Secret Trans Pacific Partnership treaty chapter reveals even greater corporate control & international policing measures
November 14, 2013

On November 13, WikiLeaks released the secret negotiated draft text for the entire TPP (Trans-Pacific Partnership) Intellectual Property Rights Chapter. The TPP is the largest-ever economic treaty, encompassing nations representing more than 40 per cent of the world’s GDP. The WikiLeaks release of the text comes ahead of the decisive TPP Chief Negotiators summit in Salt Lake City, Utah, on 19-24 November 2013. The chapter published by WikiLeaks is perhaps the most controversial chapter of the TPP due to its wide-ranging effects on medicines, publishers, internet services, civil liberties and biological patents. Significantly, the released text includes the negotiation positions and disagreements between all 12 prospective member states.

The TPP is the forerunner to the equally secret US-EU pact TTIP (Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership), for which President Obama initiated US-EU negotiations in January 2013. Together, the TPP and TTIP will cover more than 60 per cent of global GDP. Both pacts exclude China.

Since the beginning of the TPP negotiations, the process of drafting and negotiating the treaty’s chapters has been shrouded in an unprecedented level of secrecy. Access to drafts of the TPP chapters is shielded from the general public. Members of the US Congress are only able to view selected portions of treaty-related documents in highly restrictive conditions and under strict supervision. It has been previously revealed that only three individuals in each TPP nation have access to the full text of the agreement, while 600 ’trade advisers’ – lobbyists guarding the interests of large US corporations such as Chevron, Halliburton, Monsanto and Walmart – are granted privileged access to crucial sections of the treaty text.

The TPP negotiations are currently at a critical stage. The Obama administration is preparing to fast-track the TPP treaty in a manner that will prevent the US Congress from discussing or amending any parts of the treaty. Numerous TPP heads of state and senior government figures, including President Obama, have declared their intention to sign and ratify the TPP before the end of 2013.

WikiLeaks’ Editor-in-Chief Julian Assange stated: “The US administration is aggressively pushing the TPP through the US legislative process on the sly.” The advanced draft of the Intellectual Property Rights Chapter, published by WikiLeaks on 13 November 2013, provides the public with the fullest opportunity so far to familiarise themselves with the details and implications of the TPP.

The 95-page, 30,000-word IP Chapter lays out provisions for instituting a far-reaching, transnational legal and enforcement regime, modifying or replacing existing laws in TPP member states. The Chapter’s subsections include agreements relating to patents (who may produce goods or drugs), copyright (who may transmit information), trademarks (who may describe information or goods as authentic) and industrial design.

The longest section of the Chapter – ’Enforcement’ – is devoted to detailing new policing measures, with far-reaching implications for individual rights, civil liberties, publishers, internet service providers and internet privacy, as well as for the creative, intellectual, biological and environmental commons. Particular measures proposed include supranational litigation tribunals to which sovereign national courts are expected to defer, but which have no human rights safeguards. The TPP IP Chapter states that these courts can conduct hearings with secret evidence. The IP Chapter also replicates many of the surveillance and enforcement provisions from the shelved SOPA and ACTA treaties.

The consolidated text obtained by WikiLeaks after the 26-30 August 2013 TPP meeting in Brunei – unlike any other TPP-related documents previously released to the public – contains annotations detailing each country’s positions on the issues under negotiation. Julian Assange emphasises that a “cringingly obsequious” Australia is the nation most likely to support the hardline position of US negotiators against other countries, while states including Vietnam, Chile and Malaysia are more likely to be in opposition. Numerous key Pacific Rim and nearby nations – including Argentina, Ecuador, Colombia, South Korea, Indonesia, the Philippines and, most significantly, Russia and China – have not been involved in the drafting of the treaty.

In the words of WikiLeaks’ Editor-in-Chief Julian Assange, “If instituted, the TPP’s IP regime would trample over individual rights and free expression, as well as ride roughshod over the intellectual and creative commons. If you read, write, publish, think, listen, dance, sing or invent; if you farm or consume food; if you’re ill now or might one day be ill, the TPP has you in its crosshairs.”

Current TPP negotiation member states are the United States, Japan, Mexico, Canada, Australia, Malaysia, Chile, Singapore, Peru, Vietnam, New Zealand and Brunei.

Read the full secret TPP treaty IP chapter here

springwise:

Suit features integrated wearable payment
Cards offering contactless payments have arguably made retail transactions easier, but haven’t got rid of the wallet altogether. However, there are companies working hard on smarter ways to buy goods and services, such as Finland’s Uniqul, which is developing facial recognition-powered payments. The latest is the Power Suit, a piece of wearable tech that enables owners to pay with a swipe of their sleeve. READ MORE…
Apr 30, 2014 / 24 notes

springwise:

Suit features integrated wearable payment

Cards offering contactless payments have arguably made retail transactions easier, but haven’t got rid of the wallet altogether. However, there are companies working hard on smarter ways to buy goods and services, such as Finland’s Uniqul, which is developing facial recognition-powered payments. The latest is the Power Suit, a piece of wearable tech that enables owners to pay with a swipe of their sleeve. READ MORE…

Apr 30, 2014 / 9 notes
yahoofinance:

Not only is it Tax Day but it’s also the day consumers can grab their own Google Glass for $1,500, by going here. It’s a one-day-only offer for now, as Google looks to expand its “explorers” base (or, as some would say, their army of Glassholes). These new users are also taking on the risk of being heckled, ridiculed — even assaulted — in public, partly due to “mass fear of the unknown” syndrome. Here’s the story of one guy who experienced the backlash side of Glass. 
Apr 16, 2014 / 13 notes

yahoofinance:

Not only is it Tax Day but it’s also the day consumers can grab their own Google Glass for $1,500, by going here. It’s a one-day-only offer for now, as Google looks to expand its “explorers” base (or, as some would say, their army of Glassholes). These new users are also taking on the risk of being heckled, ridiculed even assaulted in public, partly due to “mass fear of the unknown” syndrome. Here’s the story of one guy who experienced the backlash side of Glass. 

Apr 16, 2014 / 9 notes

yahoofinance:

Yes, Walmart works the system: Don’t hate the player, hate the game

In conjunction with the April 15 tax deadline, the organization Americans for Tax Fairness released its annual report on Walmart and the Walton Family.

Subtitled “How Taxpayers Subsidize Americas’s Biggest Employer and Richest Family,” the report concludes the company and its founding family received $7.8 billion in tax breaks and taxpayer subsidies in 2013, featuring:

  • $6.2 billion in public assistance to Walmart workers, namely Food Stamps and Medicaid
  • $1 billion in federal tax breaks, notably via the use of accelerated depreciation
  • $670 million directly to the Walton family due to lower tax rates on capital gains and dividends vs. wages

Walmart (WMT) calls the report “inaccurate and misleading” and even some who support its overall focus take issue with the specific findings.